Lagrange Prize

Introduction

The Lagrange Prize – CRT Foundation was established in 2008 as an emblematic element of the Lagrange Project created by the CRT Foundation in 2003, with the purpose of giving life to a new culture of innovation, as well as influencing the Piedmontese productive system. The Lagrange Project, coordinated by the ISI Foundation, is considered today as one of the largest and most innovative European projects on complex systems science and data science, which, through grants for basic and applied research in collaboration between academy and industry, has supported and is still supporting the scientific complexity and data science community in planning, mapping and developing such interdisciplinary area realm.

Winners

2017

Danielle S. Bassett
Danielle S. Bassett is Eduardo D. Glandt Faculty Fellow Associate Professor at the University of Pennsylvania.
With her group Danielle Bassett studies biological, physical, and social systems by using and developing tools from network science and complex systems theory. Their broad goal is to isolate problems at the intersection of basic science, engineering, and clinical medicine that can be tackled using systems-level approaches.
Bassett's group is currently studying dynamic changes in network architecture, the interaction between topological properties of networks and physical or other constraints, and the influence of network topology on signal propagation and system function. They use a combination of data analysis, mathematical modelling, and empirical studies to investigate these phenomena.

2016

John Brownstein
John Brownstein, Ph.D. is Professor of Pediatrics and Biomedical Informatics at Harvard Medical School and is the Chief Innovation Officer of Boston Children’s Hospital. He also directs the Computational Epidemiology Group at the Children’s Hospital Informatics Program in Boston.
He was trained as an epidemiologist at Yale University.
Overall, his research agenda aims to have translation impact on the surveillance, control and prevention of disease.
He has been at the forefront of the development and application of digital health tools including HealthMap.org, an internet-based global infectious disease intelligence system. Dr. Brownstein has advised the World Health Organization, Institute of Medicine, the US Department of Health and Human Services, and the White House on real-time public health surveillance.
He has authored over 200 peer-reviewed articles which have provided foundational learnings for the emerging field of digital epidemiology.

2015

Jure Leskovec
Jure Leskovec is Assistant Professor of Computer Science at Stanford University where is member of the InfoLab and the AI lab. His research focuses on mining and modeling large social and information networks, their evolution, and diffusion of information and influence over them.

Panos Ipeirotis
Panos Ipeirotis is Associate Professor and George A. Kellner Faculty Fellow at the Department of Information, Operations, and Management Sciences at Leonard N. Stern School of Business of New York University. His recent research interests focus on crowdsourcing and on mining user-generated content on the Internet.

2014

Mark Newman
Mark Newman with his group conducts research on the structure and function of networks, particularly social and information networks, that are studied using a combination of empirical methods, analytics, and computer simulation.
Among other things, he has investigated scientific coauthorship networks, citation networks, email networks, friendship networks, epidemiological contact networks, and animal social networks; his group studied fundamental network properties such as degree distributions, centrality measures, assortative mixing, vertex similarity, and community structure, and made analytic or computer models of disease propagation, friendship formation, the spread of computer viruses, , the Internet, and network navigation algorithms.

2013

Duncan J. Watts
Is a principal researcher at Microsoft Research and a founding member of the MSR-NYC lab. From 2000-2007, he was a professor of Sociology at Columbia University, and then, prior to joining Microsoft, a principal research scientist at Yahoo! Research, where he directed the Human Social Dynamics group. Watts describes his research as exploring the "role that network structure plays in determining or constraining system behavior, focusing on a few broad problem areas in social science such as information contagion, financial risk management, and organizational design”. More recently he has attracted attention for his modern-day replication of Stanley Milgram's small world experiment using email messages and for his studies of popularity and fads in on-line and other communities. The six degrees research is based on his 1998 paper with Steven Strogatz in which the two presented a mathematical theory of the small world phenomenon.

Riccardo Luna
Is an Italian journalist and writer, director of the online magazine “CheFuturo!” and was formerly the first director of Wired Italian edition. Since 2011 he has written about innovation on La Repubblica newspaper. He’s also columnist on Wired, Vanity Fair and Traveller. Since 2012 he is Chairman of Wikitalia, an association whose aim is to spread transparency, open data and participation in Italian politics by the use of the Internet. He is also coordinator of the Expo2015 Innovation Advisory Board and Board Member of Oxfam and Building Green Future.

2012

Lada Adamic
Is Associate Professor at the School of information & Center for the study of Complex Systems of the University of Michigan. She studies the structure and dynamics of social and information networks, with particular enphasis on information di usion, expertise sharing and on line communities.

Xavier Gabaix
Is Associate Professor of Finance at the NYU Stern School of Business. His reasearch interests focus on asset pricing, executive pay, the causes and consequences of seemingly irrational behavior, the origin scaling laws in economics and macroeconomics.

2011

Albert Laszlo Barabasi
He is a Distinguished University Professor at Northeastern University, Boston where he directs the Center for Complex Networks Research and holds appointments in the Departments of physics, Computer Science and Biology, as well as in the Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women Hospital and is a member of the Center for Cancer Systems Biology at Dana Farber Cancer Institute.
Barabasi’s work on complex networks lead to the discovery of scale-free networks and he proposed the Barabasi-Albert model to explain their widespread emergence in natural, technological and social systems, from the cellular telephone to the WWW or online communities.

2010

James J. Collins
Professor of Biomedical Engineering and Co-Director of the Center for BioDynamics at Boston University.
He is one of the founders of the emerging eld of synthetic biology and a pioneering researcher in systems biology, stochastic resonance, biological dynamics and neurostimulation.

2009

Giorgio Parisi
Full professor at the University La Sapienza in Rome where currently teaches probability theory, is member of the Accademia Nazionale dei Lincei and of the National Academy of Science.
He did research in several fields of Physics and in particular in Physics of disordered systems and statistical mechanics.
He is author and co-author of a number of scientific books like La Chiave, la luce e l’ubriaco and Statistical Physics.